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Summary:

Earliest information: 1457
Original estate:  Chantry of Blessed Virgin Mary
Common Rights?  Yes (109 and 110) (Frontage 37ft; each 1 horse or 2 cows)
Date of current building: ?1722 (date on rainwater hopper)
Listed: Grade II

Thumbnail History:

Yonge -> Goldyng -> Tuckhyll -> …. -> Forty -> …. ->  Woodroffe -> Atherton -> Hidden -> Clifford -> Lanfear  -> Smith -> Estate agents
Known as "Lancaster House".

Description of property:

From Listed Building records: House, now house, office and shop. 17th century, refronted in mid 18th century. Steep hipped tiled roof with three pedimented dormers. Brick walls with high panelled parapet and flat bands at base of parapet and first floor, moulded stone coping to parapet and stone ball finials to ends. Two storeys and attic. Three glazing bar sashes, the centre being narrower, 20th century shop front to left of ground floor, central door under flat hood on cut brackets, plain window to right of ground floor and door to far right. Interior: 18th century panelling to ground floor room on left of hall.

Photo Gallery:

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- 109-110 High Street, Mar 2015

- Will Clifford on the step of his shop, 110 High Street, 1928. The shop sign says that Clifford's boot and shoe business was established in 1700. Records show that in 1869 Stephen Clifford ran a boot and shoemaking business in Charnham Street, and that it moved to 110 High Street, now Peppermint Cream (interior design) and Marc Allen (estate agents) c1891. The shopkeeper in this photograph is Stephen's son, William Martin Clifford, who ran the business from c1920 until it closed in 1966. Advertisements in the window include Wren's polish, Blanco, Brook's Dye Works in Bristol, K Shoes and Boots, and Comac Shoes.

- Flo Clifford outside her husband's  Shoe Shop, 110 High Street, c1939

- 109-110 High Street, 1943

- Rear of 109-110 High Street, date uncertain.

- 109-110 High Street, Mar 2007

Timeline:

1457 (NH) This property seems to be on one of the oldest recorded sites in Hungerford, mentioned in 1457 in the will of John Yonge, who was an important local officer, the collector of rents for Lord Hungerford. In his will he left to his wife Matilda (Maud) for her lifetime his house which was situated between the tenement of John Gunter on the south (=109 HS) and that of the Abbess and Convent of Goring on the north side (=111 HS). From the rent of this property the sum of 12d was to be paid in two equal instalments annually towards the maintenance of a priest at the Chantry of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Hungerford. After the death of Matilda the house was to be sold by his executors and the proceeds to be used as an obituary.

c.1460 (NH) John Goldyng.

1470 (NH) John Tuckhyll. It is possible to identify this site because we have a Duchy of Lancaster rental of the town taken about 1470. In this appears the following entries for the east side of the High Street (reading from south to north (actually north to south! – HLP)):-
- Henry Capper holds ½ burgage which belongs to the Abbess of Goring, quit rent 4d. (=111 HS)
- John Tuckhyll holds ¼ part of a burgage late John Goldyng's, quit rent 2d. (109-110 HS)
- William Gunter holds ¼ part of a burgage late John Goldyng's, quit rent 2d. (?=109-110 HS)

The property to the north (111 High Street) is the only property for which the Abbbess of Goring appears in this or any other rental of the town. It may be surmised that John Gunter's property to the south has been inhabited by William, and that John Young's property was sold and became successively first John Goldyng's, then John Tuckhyll's.

1663 (NH Hearth Tax) John Forty, 3 hearths(?) ?position

1722  Date appears on rainwater hopper.

1753-61 (QR) Alexander Thistlethwaite for his upper house, q.r. 4d.

1774-90 (QR) James [amended to] Anthony Woodroffe for house wherein he dwelt, q.r. 4d.

1781  (CL) James Woodroffe.

1786 (NH Royal Exchange Assurance Policy 97765, 8 June 1786) Anthony Woodroffe insured a house, brewhouse and offices situate near the market place late in occupation of James Woodroffe deceased, and adjacent to the Craven Arms.
1795-1804 (QR) Anthony Woodroffe for house late James Woodroffe's, q.r. 4d.

1805-17 (QR) Anthony Woodroffe (amended to " Devisees of Anthony Woodroffe", amended to Sarah Woodroffe) for house late James Woodroffe, q.r. 4d.

1807 (CL) James Woodroffe own; Elizabeth Butts, occ.

1818-23 (QR) Devisees of Sarah Woodroffe, amended to William Atherton,  for house late James Woodroffe, q.r. 4d.

1819  (EA) 109+110 one property - strip plot to back lane. Un-named

1832  (QR) William Atherton for house late Anthony Woodroffe, q.r. 4d.
1836  (QR) William Atherton for house late Anthony Woodroffe, q.r. 4d.

1841  (CS) Ambrose Lanfear (60) Independent.
1843 (CL) -do-

1847 (CL) William Atherton (own); Ambrose Lanfear (occ)
1851 (CS) Ambrose Lanfear - gent., & landed prop.

1861 (CL) William Atherton (owner)

[1869 (PO) Stephen Clifford, boot and shoe maker, Charnham Street. (The first directory to mention Clifford).]

1871 (CS) George Hidden (41) - organist (Also Registrar of Hungerford, census enumerator, organist at Parish Church)

[1877 (KD) Stephen Clifford, boot and shoe maker, Charnham Street.]

1881 (CS) George Hidden (51) - music seller.  George Hidden (22) - organist & music teacher

 (*3) George Hidden (father of G.H. b.1830) died in 1836.

109 High Street:

1891 (KD) Stephen Clifford - boot & shoemaker, HS.
1896 (CL) Stephen Clifford (owner), Louis Clifford (occ)
1902 (T&M Register) Stephen Clifford (owner)
1903 (T&M Register) Louis Clifford (occupier until ?1915)
1911 (KD) Louis Clifford - dairyman, HS.
1914  (CL) -do-

1916 (T&M Register) William M Clifford (occupier)
1917 (T&M Register) Louis Clifford (occupier until ?1919)
1920 (T&M Register) William M Clifford (occupier until ?1929)

19??  (Mrs. May Marks, Ramsbury) Cliffords had right of way through 111 HS via coach house and arch onto High Street
1914 (CL) Stephen Clifford (own); Louis Clifford (occ)
1920 (KD) Stephen Clifford - boot and shoemaker, HS. (Louis Clifford - ironmonger, HS - ?where).

1928 Date of photograph used in Pictorial History. Val Troke says "aunt" Mrs Vera Walters (of Hillside Road) lived in one half of 109-110 HS. Brought up by her aunt and uncle the Cliffords in Hungerford. Came 1927. Remembers being told the photo being taken shortly after.

1930 (T&M Register) Harry Hawkes (occupier until ?1944)

c.1932 (QR #25) Mr. Clifford, for "House late Anthony Woodroffe's then Wm. Atherton's", q.r. 4d.

Undated (T&M Register) Wiliam M Clifford (owner)

1939 (BL) H.H. Hawkes, hairdresser

1939  (KD) William Martin Clifford - boot & shoemaker. (Jack Williams recalls that his research into the Glorious Revolution at the time of the 300th Anniversary, showed that Cliffords were making boots in 1687 – but he does not remember the premises.)

1945 (T&M Register) Mrs Kathleen Hetty Jones (occupier)

1947 (CL) Mrs Hattie Kathleen Jones.

1952  (CL) Victor Cyril Walter. (m. Vera Clifford )
1956 (CL) Victor Cyril Walter
1963 (CL) Victor Cyril Walter
1968 (T&M Register) Victor Cyril Walter (occupier until 1971)

1966 (Mrs. Val Troke) Shoe shop closed 1966/7. Mr Clifford continued to do a few repairs until his death in his 80s in 1968.

1968 (T&M Register) Florence Emily Clifford (owner)

1968  (Mrs. Val Troke) W.M. Clifford died.
1968 (CL) Victor Cyril Walter
1969  (Mrs. Val Troke) Mrs. Clifford died. Property left to Mrs. Val Troke (adopted dtr) and a niece. They sold it to Mr. Betts in about 1971.
1970 (CL) Victor Cyril Walter
197? (Miss Betty Munford) "Before George Smith, it was Mr Hawkes, barber".

1976 (CL) Void – Empire Bookmakers

1978 Hants & Dorset – estate agents

1983 (CL) Void – Empire Bookmakers
1984 (CL) Void
1985 (CL) Mr. W.A.K. Betts (owner), Empire Bookmakers tenants.
1985 (CL) Void

Undated (T&M Register) Trustees of Marie Louise Betts (Deceased) (owners)
1986 Mr Betts sold to Jim Woodhead, developer.

1990 Renovations: Bookmakers closed. Estate Agents became high-class shoe and accessory shop called "Rebecca", run by Mrs Woodhead.

1992 Mark Allen Estate Agents (moved from 47HS - previously Elcome's butchers) South end of this was called Barnes Associates.
- Whole building called "Lancaster House" again.
- Upstairs: Systems Marketing.
2000 (CL) Void due to non-residential status
2005 (CL) Void due to non-residential status
2007 Marc Allen, estate agents

Oct 2008  Marc Allen moved to 110. Peppermint Cream opened [interior design goods and gifts].
2011 (CL) Lesley Hall
Oct 2014 Peppermint Cream closed

Mar 2015 Manningford Croft, Estate Agents opened
2016 (CL) ...

110 High Street:

1891 (KD) Stephen Clifford - boot & shoemaker, HS.
1896 (CL) Stephen Clifford (owner), Stephen Clifford (occ)
1902 (T&M Register) Stephen Clifford (owner)
1903 (T&M Register) Stephen Clifford (occupier until ?1928)
1911 (KD) Louis Clifford - dairyman, HS.
1914  (CL) -do-
19??  (Mrs. May Marks, Ramsbury) Cliffords had right of way through 111 HS via coach house and arch onto High Street
1914 (CL) Stephen Clifford (own); Stephen Clifford (occ)
1920 (KD) Stephen Clifford - boot and shoemaker, HS. (Louis Clifford - ironmonger, HS - ?where).

1928 Date of photograph used in Pictorial History. Val Troke says "aunt" Mrs Vera Walters (of Hillside Road) lived in one half of 109-110 HS. Brought up by her aunt and uncle the Cliffords in Hungerford. Came 1927. Remembers being told the photo being taken shortly after.

1929 (T&M egister) William Clifford (occupier)

c.1932 (QR #25) Mr. Clifford, for "House late Anthony Woodroffe's then Wm. Atherton's", q.r. 4d.

Undated (T&M Register) Wiliam M Clifford (owner)

1939 (BL) W.M. Clifford, boot and shoe outfitter
1939  (KD) William Martin Clifford - boot & shoemaker. (Jack Williams recalls that his research into the Glorious Revolution at the time of the 300th Anniversary, showed that Cliffords were making boots in 1687 – but he does not remember the premises.)
1947 (CL) William Martin Clifford.
1952 (CL) William Martin Clifford.
1956 (CL) William Martin Clifford
1963 (CL) William Martin Clifford
1966 (Mrs. Val Troke) Shoe shop closed 1966/7. Mr Clifford continued to do a few repairs until his death in his 80s in 1968.
1968  (Mrs. Val Troke) W.M. Clifford died.

1968 (T&M Register) Florence Emily Clifford (occupier until 1969)
1968 (T&M Register) Mrs Florence Emily Clifford (owner)
1969  (Mrs. Val Troke) Mrs. Clifford died. Property left to Mrs. Val Troke (adopted dtr) and a niece. They sold it to Mr. Betts in about 1971.
1970 (CL) Void
1970 (T&M Register) Void until 1973.

197? (Miss Betty Munford) "Before George Smith, it was Mr Hawkes, barber".

1974 (T&M Register) George William Smith (occupier until 1976)
1976 (CL) George William Smith (barber) (deleted)  Void

1978 Hants & Dorset – estate agents
1983 (CL) Void
1984 (CL) Void
1985 Hants & Berks Estate Agents.
1985 (CL) Void

1986 Mr Betts sold to Jim Woodhead, developer.

1990 Renovations: Estate Agents became high-class shoe and accessory shop called "Rebecca", run by Mrs Woodhead.

1992 Whole building called "Lancaster House" again.
         Hants & Berks Property Estate Agents.

1998 Lane Fox Estate Agents (?when did this come - a few years ago?)
2000 (CL) Void due to non-residential status

?2000 Dickins Hopgood and Chidley, Solicitors (established 1996), at 110 HS for several years before moved to Old National School at end of 2003.

2005 (CL) 110: Void
2007 Lane Fox, estate agents
2008 Lane Fox closed.

Oct 2008  Marc Allen moved from 109 to 110.
2011 (CL) Void
2016 (CL) Void

From Norman Hidden's papers:

This property seems to be on one of the oldest recorded sites in Hungerford, mentioned in 1457 in the will of John Yonge, who was an important local officer, the collector of rents for Lord Hungerford.

In his will he left to his wife Matilda (Maud) for her lifetime his house which was situated between the tenement of John Gunter on the south and that of the Abbess and Convent of Goring on the north side. From the rent of this property the sum of 12d was to be paid in two equal instalments annually towards the maintenance of a priest at the Chantry of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Hungerford. After the death of Matilda the house was to be sold by his executors and the proceeds to be used as an obituary.

It is possible to identify this site because we have a Duchy of Lancaster rental of the town taken about 1470. In this appears the following entries for the east side of the High Street (reading from south to north):-

- Henry Capper holds ½ burgage which belongs to the Abbess of Goring, quit rent 4d.
- John Tuckhyll holds ¼ part of a burgage late John Goldyng's, quit rent 2d.
- William Gunter holds ¼ part of a burgage late John Goldyng's, quit rent 2d.

The property to the north is the only property for which the Abbbess of Goring appears in this or any other rental of the town. It may be surmised that John Gunter's property to the south has been inhabited by William, and that John Young's property was sold and became successively first John Goldyng's, then John Tuckhyll's.

1663 Hearth Tax: John Forty, 3 hearths(?)

1786 Royal Exchange Assurance Policy 97765, 8 June 1786. Anthony Woodroffe insured a house, brewhouse and offices situate near the market place late in occupation of James Woodroffe deceased, and adjacent to the Craven Arms.

Thoughts by Jack Williams, 16.1.2008:

Mrs. Will Clifford was my Auntie Flo (my mother's sister). I came on holiday from Chilton Foliat on a regular basis in the early to mid thirties.

Breakfast was always two slices of Porky Jessett's round tin loaf, liberally covered in fish paste, but before breakfast Uncle Will and I crossed the common to shoot rabbits, on the south side of the railway, close to the rubbish dump.

It is fascinating to remember Uncle Will mending shoes – sitting on a low bench before a huge window; his mouth held the small nails, a rolled-up cigarette and he always seemed to be singing – quite incredible.

The shop was quite amazing, Will's gall stones in a jam jar were displayed for interested people. There were apples, pears, raspberries, black currants and gooseberries in season, but Margaret particularly remembers the bunches of Lilly of-the-Valley all on sale amongst the shoes.

The entrance hall was superb, a huge polished cupboard, cases of stuffed fish, a magnificent staircase, and a loud ringing bell when the front door opened. There was a great cellar with apple racks, and an unexplored attic; a large bedroom occupied by Mr Garabet, a dentist from Marlborough one day a week, as I remember.

The garden stretched to Fairview Road, and was a maze of paths all edged with low growing box hedges. There was a summer house midway in the garden. To me it seemed quite large, full of interesting items – fishing rods, shot guns, rabbit snares, garden tools, old seats, wheelbarrows, buckets, etc. At Fairview Road there were stables and cowsheds, some converted into workshops for my father's decorating business.

It was a magical place to visit."