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Historic pre 20th century roads:

- High Street

- Bridge Street

- Charnham Street

- Church Street

- Dedeman's Lane (first 1382)

- Fairview Road, the old back lane on the east of the medieval town. See "Bright new future for Fairfields", 21 Jan 2016.

- Cow Lane became Park Street sometime between 1847 and 1854.

Early roads:

Listed below are the dates of various later roads in the town. Those in existence before 1893 include:

- Priory Road

- Church Way

- Honeyfields

- Bulpit Lane

- Prospect Road

Modern roads:

After 1893, the local council "adopted" roads of satisfactory quality, sometimes some years after their construction.

The following list includes those advised (in 1982) by Berkshire County Council between 1956 and 1979. Added to this is information provided (Jul 2017) by Dr Jimmy Whittaker, based on data provided by Robin Mann at West Berkshire Council. The list is in chronological order:

1921: Atherton Crescent (but only adopted in 1970). It was n

1936: Tarrant's Hill - date unknown (see correspondence between John Allen and Peter Durrant). Possibly nsamed after Ann Tarrant, listed in the Tithe Award, 1848 as the owner of property closeby.

1937: Dog Lane (Church Way) - built for the council by J. Wooldridge & Son. Dog Lane was finally tarmacced in 2010.

1945: Honeyfields - built for the council after WWII.

1950: Sarum Way - built by Vockins Bros, and adopted in 1967. Name relates to being near the road to Sarum / Salisbury.

1954: Priory Avenue (nottyh end). North east side was built by J Wooldright & Son, and the west side by J T Gibbs & Co Ltd. Wooldridge and Son had their premises on the canal wharf and Gibbs and Co were based on the corner of the Bath Road and Wantage Road, which today is Middleton Close.

1954: Breech Square - built by J T Gibbs & Co Ltd, as a sheltered housing scheme. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1957: Moore's Place - built for the council. May have been named after Ernest Moore, Constable 1957-58?

1958: Coldharbour Road (adopted 1970) - built for the council by JT Gibbs & Co. Named after Coldharbour Farm, south-east of the town.

1961: Chilton Way - built adjacent to the Chilton Factory.

1963: Park Way (adopted 1970) - built for the council by J T Gibbs & Co Ltd.

1964: Fairfields, the access road to Fairfields sheltered housing in Fairfiew Road opposite the Primary School. Site redeveloped 2017.

1965: Macklin Close (adopted 1969) - built (according to Jimmy Whittaker) for Mrs M E Brown, a relation of the England Football manager Bobby Robson. Named after the local dairymnan family, Macklin, whose fields were in this area of the town.

1966: Homefield Way (First section, adopted 1972) - built by J T Gibbs & Co Ltd. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1967: Port Down (adopted 1968) - built by Croft Ltd for the council. Named after the Common Port Down.

1969: Priory Avenue (south end)

1969: Orchard Park Close (adopted 1973) - built by Wilson (Swindon) Ltd. Thought to have been named after a former allotment site which presumably contained fruit trees.1969:

1969: Hillside Road (adoptedcd 1973) - built by Wilson (Swindon) Ltd. Named after its physical location on the side of a hill that runs between Fairview Road and Priory Road.

1969: Bourne Vale (adopted 1977) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Probably named after the River Shalbourne (now the Shalbourne Brook) running in the valley below.

1972: Homefield Way (2nd section) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1973: Canal Walk (adopted 1977) - built by Masthead Investments. Named after its position adjacent to the Kennet and Avon Canal.

1974: Lancaster Square (adopted 1974) - built by Newbury District Council for Berkshire CC. Its name reflects the town's connection with John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.

1974: Regent Close (adopted 1977) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Named after the former Regent cinema that stood on this site.

1975: Clarks Gardens (adopted 1976) - built by Vockins Bros (extended 1972).

1975: Chilton Way (new section, adopted 1981) - built by Federated Homes Ltd.

1975: Chantry Mead (adopted 1981) - built by Federated Homes Ltd. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1975: Westbrook Close (adopted 1981) - built by Federated Homes Ltd. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1976: York Road (adoptoed 1976) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd.

1976: De Montfort Grove (adopted 1983) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Named to reflect the town's historic connection with Simon de Montfort.

1977: Homefield Way (3rd section) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Named after one of the historic common fields.

1978: Morley Place (adopted 1982) - built by Trencherwood Estates. Named after JT Morley and Sons, a local building complany with premises between Fairview Road and the High Street from the end of WWII.

1979: Lancaster Close - built by Newbury District Council for Berkshire CC. Named to reflect the town's connection with the Duchy of Lancaster.

1982: Combe View (adopted 1987) - built by JT Gibbs and Co Ltd. Named after the view south towards Combe Hill and the Combe Gibbet.

1984: Bearwater built by Beechcroft Developments.

1985: Pound Piece, Freemans Close and Wiltshire Close built by Trencherwood New Homes Ltd.

1986: Wessex Close and Somerset Close, built by Trencherwood New Homes Ltd. Named to refelct Hungerford's position in the North Wessex Downs. 

1987: Cherry Grove (adopted 1991) - built by Trencherwood New Homes Ltd. Named after a magnificent row of flowering cherry trees that bordered the front of the Chilton Factory and Church Way. 

1992: Kennet Way (adopted 1996) - built by Trencherwood New Homes Ltd.

1994: Hamblin Meadows (adopted 1995)- built by Vockins Holdings.

1995: Ramsbury Drive (adopted 2000) - built by Trencherwood Homes Ltd. Named after the village of Ramsbury, which was part of the workhouse union of Hungerford and Ramsbury.

1995 Aldbourne Close (adopted 2000) - built by Trencherwood Homes Ltd. Named after the village of Aldbourne.

2001: Williams Court - named after John Charles (Jack) Williams named as The Citizen of the Century in 2000 for his extensive contribution to Hungerford and its people.

2002: Cottrell Close - built by David Wilson Homes (South Eastern) Ltd. Named after the local iron founder, George Cottrell.

2002: Kennedy Meadows (adopted 2006) - built by David Wilson Homes. Named after the Kennedy family, notably Dr Robert Kennedy a local doctor for many years and his wife Becky who was the first lady chairman of the Hungerford Rural District Council.

See also:

- Bridge Street properties

- Charnham Street properties

- High Street properties

- The Hidden Index of Historic Hungerford Road Names

- Other Roads Photo Gallery