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HMS Freesia K43 was a Flower Class corvette which was adopted by Hungerford in 1940-41.

£90,000 was raised in Hungerford and district in "Warship Week" in 1941 to pay for the Freesia.

The Freesia was laid down on 18 Jun 1940 at Harland & Wolff in Belfast, launched just 15 weeks later on 3 Oct, and went into service on 19 Nov.

Flower class corvettes were small convoy escort boats, capable of being built quickly, of mounting the then available anti-submarine equipment, of surviving the heavy seas around the British Isles, and of matching U-boat speeds. They were armed with one 4 inch gun, a crew of 70, and reached a speed of 16 knots. 145 Flower-class corvettes were eventually built, and they inflicted considerable damage to attacking U-boats, sinking over 50 enemy submarines.

In May 1942 HMS Freesia took part in "Operation Ironclad". Following the successful operation, her Captain wrote to the crew:

"Freesia had the honour to lead in Force "F" to Courier Bay through mined and narrow waters which were commanded by hostile battery of guns. Complete surprise was achieved and the gunners were captured all asleep in the battery by our commando troops. I believe it is necessary to go back in history as far as General Wolfe and Quebec to find a case of complete surprise in a combined operation. I was very proud of you."

On 12 Dec 1942, HMS Freesia (under Lt. R.A. Cherry, RNR) helped to pick up 44 survivors when the British merchant Empire Gull was torpedoed and sunk west of Maputo, Portuguese East Africa.

The original captain Commander Crick lived to the age of 95 years, and died in 1997.

The crew of HMS Freesia visited Hungerford in April 1946: "In reply to an invitation sent to them, Mr E L Tye has received notification that the Captain and members of the crew of HMS Freesia, the corvette adopted by Hungerford Rural District in Warship week, are visiting Hungerford this Saturday. An address of welcome will be given by Mr A G Turner from the Town Hall Steps at 3.45pm to which the commanding officer of HMS Freesia will reply. Tea will be served in the British restaurant and anyone in the district who has served in the Royal Navy, Merchant Navy or the Royal Marines is invited...."

Archie Coverdale:

One of the sailors on HMS Freesia was Archie Coverdale, who served for three years from 1941-1943. Archie was born in Southwark London in 1920 and moved to Boxted a small village near Colchester in Essex when he was 4 when his father took up an agricultural job. We are grateful to Archie's son Les Coverdale who has kindly contacted the Virtual Museum to offer a large number of photographs taken on board ship during this period, some of which are shown in the Photo Gallery.

What happened to HMS Freesia in the end?

In July 1946 HMS Freesia was sold to the merchant fleet and was sunk on 1 Apr 1947.

Follow this for the letter from P. G. Crick Commander RN to the ship's company on leaving HMS Freesia to assume command of HMS Keren.

Photo Gallery:

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- H.M.S. Freesia K43 1940-1947

- Archie Coverdale back row 2nd from right and crew mates from HMS Freesia

- Archie Coverdale on HMS Freesia firing the twin Lewis gun during target practice

- HMS Auricula, another corvette, which struck a mine during operation Ironclad, the taking of Madagascar to prevent a Japanese flanking movement. Fortunately there were no casualties.

- Archie Coverdale on HMS Freesia (with HMS Frittilary in the background)

- Picking up some of the 44 survivors after the sinking of the Empire Gull by a torpedo off Maputo, Portuguese East Africa (now Mozambique) on 12 Dec 1942.

See also:

- Second World War