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Summary:

Earliest information: c.1340
Original Estate: Hungerford Engleford
Common Rights? Yes (frontage 25ft; 2 horses or 4 cows)
Date of current building:
Listed? No

Thumbnail History:

Golding -> Hungerford -> Richard, Duke of Gloucester -> Throgmorton -> Passion -> Rabbettes -> Baynton -> Stockwell -> Robinson, brazier -> Cheyney -> Robinson -> Bird -> Robinson -> Blacksmith (Oakes Wiggins Willes Oakes Bros ) -> Estate Agents (Thake & Pagington -> Hamptons -> NyeHaines -> Nye & Co.)

Description of property:

Photo Gallery:

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- Nye & Co, Mar 2007

- Oakes Bros, c1953

- Memorial in St Lawrence Church to William and Ann Cheyney, murdered 1762

- James Seddon, of Oakes Bros

Timeline:

c.1340 (NH) John Golding

(NH) Walter Hungerford

1470 (NH) Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III

1552 (NH) Robert Throgmorton. In 1552 the property would seem to be held by Robert Throgmorton (lord of the manor by right of his ..?.. nee Hungerford) by John Burke, late in the tenure of Richard Forrest. Neither of these names occur in the 1522 muster, nor in the 1513 terrier.

1573 (NH) Richard Passion, (?)weaver. By 1573 a copyhold in the manor of Hungerford Engleford was held by Richard Passion and the tenement is stated to have a garden and backside, together with 7 acres of land, of which 2 acres were in the Everlong, 2 in the Breach, and 3 in Pidden Field.
- He is probably the Richard Passion, weaver who died in 1602, and was buried in the parish church, and who had daughters baptised there (Margaret 1568/9 and Mary 1571).

1583 (NH) Ingram Rabbettes (Roberts), turner, woodworker (see inventory below). In any event Richard Passion seems to have moved to another dwelling and was replaced in his copyhold in 1583 by Ingram Rabbettes (or Roberts) for his life and that of his two daughters Mary (born 1575) and Alice (born 1581).
- His rent, by the way, was 15s 4d, and to this was added the traditional quit rent of 4d.

Inventory of Ingram Rabbettes, c.1604:
The inventory of Ingram's goods mentions a middle chamber, a little chamber, and "his lodging chambers". These were all first floor rooms and in addition there were some "malt lofts" or garrets in which malt was stored. On the ground floor was a hall, a kitchen, and a well house.
In addition to the well for the family's domestic water supply, this contained a "yewting(?) vat", barrels and a kiver (or tub).
At the front (or High Street) side of the house was a shop, that is a separate door, and a window onto the street which could be covered and barred by wooden shutters.
Within the shop were his working tools for his trade as turner or skilled woodworker and "certain ware made, with other necessaries". Outside in the barn which stood in his garden there was a store of corn for the winter.

1604? (NH) William and Mary (nee Rabbetttes) Baynton. Ingram Rabbettes continued to hold the property until his death aged 64 years when it passed to his daughter Mary. Mary had married William Baynton in 1605, and Alice had married Henry Millson of Aldbourne, so presumably she no longer lived in Hungerford and the residue of Ingram's estate was bequeathed to Mary, who was also his executrix.

1636-50 (NH) William Baynton died. Mary re-married – Alexander Pollentyne (Polhampton). Mary and William Baynton continued living in the house until William's death in 1636. They had had but one child, Francis, who died shortly after birth.

Mary, now 61 years of age, was alone and she quickly re-married, to Alexander Pollentyne (or Polhampton). Her new husband immediately set about repairing the house and the manor Court allocated to him 1 elm tree for this purpose.

1650 (NH) Ralph (and brother John) Stockwell. The parish register does not record when either Mary or Alexander died, but they were still in possession in 1650 when Ralph Stockwell from Shalbourne took the reversion of the tenement and its land for himself and his brother (?) John upon the death of Mary Polhampton.

In view of Mary's age this may have seemed a good investment, but he was not to enter upon the property until some 8 years later when Mary is reported to the Court in October 1658 as dead. Ralph Stockwell was thereupon admitted to the Court. A few years later (1653) Ralph was in trouble, having let part of his dwelling house without the licence of the Court "for which he forfeits his tenement, but upon humble acknowledgement his offence is forgiven".

1666 (NH) Thomas Robinson, brazier. In 1666 the Court Book declares "Ralph Stockwell who holds for his life and John Stockwell who after the death of Ralph should hold for his life, by copy dated 24 March 1650, a tenement with garden and curtilage adjoining, together with 7 acres, formerly in the tenure of Alexander Polhampton in the right of Mary, then his wife, these two give up the premises, and Thomas Robinson junior, brasier, takes the premises, to hold for himself and Susanne Robinson his daughter for term of their lives. Rent was 15s 4d per annum still, but of course a lump sum (valued at £4 back in 1623) was paid by way of a premium to secure the lease.

As Ralph had married in 1665 (to Ellin Greene) it is possible that his marriage required or provided a new residence for him, thus enabling the sale of his lease to occur.

1675-1717 (NH) Court Roll: Thomas Robinson. The last Court Roll still extant for approximately 100 years, that of April 1675, shows Thomas Robinson still in possession. Thomas Robinson was a brazier, and he was admitted to the Hocktide Court in 1655 and he is in the list of freesuitors in 1656.
- In 1665 his wife Susan died and early in 1666 he remarried, so that he too had a special reason for acquiring the lease. His daughter Susan would be an infant, and his copyhold therefore based on her life as well as his own might be expected to be a lengthy one.
- Thomas Robinson lived until 1717, and in his will he refers to "the copyhold estate wherein I now live". To his wife Joan and his son Thomas he leaves all his household goods "and all the cowcattle, hogs and pigs, and also such firewood as shall have in the backside at the time of my death". This seems to suggest that the animals were kept in the long back garden at least at night. By day they would be driven out along the Cow Lane (now Park Street) to the Down. Also in the "backside", the will tells us, was a "barn". In addition to his own family, Thomas had 2 servants, probably living en famille with him, a manservant named William Pound, and a maidservant Elizabeth Nalder.
- The copyhold continued in the family, but the next reference we have to it is not until 1776 in the will of Oliver Pool, innholder of the Red Lion in Charnham Street. He leaves to his wife Mary all his freehold property, stock in trade etc and then goes on to say "and whereas it is in question whether I have not a legal right (as I have) to all that copyhold tenement with garden and curtilage adjoining and 7 acres of arable land in the common fields of Hungerford, formerly in the tenure of John Robinson and parcel of the manor of Hungerford Ingleford, now I do hereby give it to my wife". The name Pool does not appear in the Commoners List for 1781, the position it might be expected to occupy being in some doubt.

1753-61 (QR) William Cheyney for his house, q.r. 6d.
- Cheyney was also landlord or owner of several houses in the High St., including 114 HS, Hell House (122 HS), another house on the East side of High St. and one on the West side. In whichever was his dwelling house (I am virtually certain it was 114 HS – HLP) occurred a murder which shocked both town and county.

From Berkshire Directory 1762:

"In the year 1762 a shocking murder was committed in this town, on the bodies of Mr. Cheyney and his wife, an old couple, who for many years had resided here: the murder was supposed to have been perpetrated about nine o'clock in the evening, but was not discovered till the next morning. Many persons were suspected, but no proofs appeared of their guilt. Diligent search was made after the author or authors, but without success, nor have they yet been discovered."

Note: Norman Hidden was reserved at identifying the actual house in which the Cheyney's lived, and were murdered. However, he points out that Cheyney's will identifies "the house which I now inhabit" was "held under Mr Matthew Loder for term of lives". Matthew Loder was Lord of the Manor of Hungerford Engleford. Of the three properties that Cheyney owned , only one was a Hungerford Engleford property, i.e 114 High Street. The others were 88 High Street (ex Chantry of Holy Trinity) and 121 (?122) High Street. [See "The Murder of William and Ann Cheyney" in Norman Hidden's"Aspects of the Early History of Hungerford".

There is also a full report of it in The Gentleman's Magazine (1762 vol 11, pp 124-5).

- A mural monument was erected in the parish church against the wall of the north aisle which commemorated the burial of the murdered couple in these words:- "Near this place rest the remains of William Cheyney, late of this town aged 83 and of Ann his wife, aged 71, who were barbarously murdered in their own house on the evening of 11th of December, 1762."'

Timeline cont'd:

1774-90 (QR) Thomas Robinson for house late Cheyney's, q.r. 6d.

1776 (NH) Oliver Pool?

1781 (CL) John Bird.

1792 (UD) J. Bird - farmer (also E. Bird in UD - baker, ?112 H/S)

1795-1804 (QR) Thomas Robinson for his house late Cheyney's, q.r. 6d.

1805-17 (QR) Miss Robinson for house late Cheyney's, q.r. 6d.
1818-23 (QR) Miss Robinson for house late Cheyney's, q.r. 6d.

1819 (EA) Un-namend. Park Street was labelled "Cow Lane"

1832 (QR) Jonathan Bird.
1836 (QR) Jonathan Bird for house late Miss Robinson's, q.r. 6d.

1841 (CS) Thomas Oakes (45) - blacksmith.

1843 (CS) Edward Wiggins.

1844 (PD) No Wiggins, but Sarah Oakes (Cow Lane) - blacksmith & farrier.

1847 (KD) Edwin Wiggins - blacksmith.

1847 (CL) George Willes (own); Edwin Wiggins (occ)

1851 (CS) Edwin Wiggins (30), smith.
1861 (CS) Edwin Wiggins (40)

1861 (CL) George Willes (owner), Edwin Wiggins (occup)

1871 (CS) Edwin Wiggins (49) -blacksmith.

Oakes, c1981-1972:

1891 (KD) Charles Oakes - blacksmith, H/S.

[Thomas Oakes married a Spanswick. Their son Charles Oakes (b 1837) married a Nock (daughter of the lock-keeper). They had 8 sons, 7 of whom were blacksmiths, and one daughter - E M Oakes).

1896 (CL) Robert Newton Hofland (owner); (1891 KD shows he was miller at Eddington), Oakes (occup).
1902 (T&M Register) Robert Newton Hofland (owner)
1903 (T&M Register) Albert Oakes (occupier until ?1926)

1914 (CL) Execut's Robert Newton Hofland (own); Albert George Oakes (occ).

1927 (T&M Register) James Seddon (owner & occupier)

1932 (QR #23) Oakes Bros, for "House formerly Cheyneys then Robinsons, then Birds late G. Willes", q.r. 6d.

1939 (Blacket's) Oakes Bros (J. Seddon), engineers
- E.J. and C.E. Budd Ltd., dentists

1947 (CL) Oakes Bros Ltd.
1952 (CL) Oakes Bros. Ltd.
1956 (CL) Oakes Bros. Ltd.
1963 (CL) Oakes Bros. Ltd.

1968 (CL) Void
<1968 (T&M Register) Oakes Bros Ltd (owner until 1972)

1970 (CL) Void

Gift shop, c1973-1975:

1973 (T&M Register) John Paul (Hungerford) Ltd (owners until 1975); John Paul Greenwood (occupier until 1975)
1973 A gift shop.

Alterations to building to allow widening of Park Street – southern third of building demolished.

Thake & Pagington, Estate Agents, 1975-1984:

1975? Thake & Pagington - estate agents. (Peter Inch, manager)
1976 (CL) Void
1976 (T&M Register) Stanley Pocock & Joyce Pagington (owners)
1978 Thake & Paginton – estate agents
1979 (T&M Regosyer) Peter Inch (occupier)
1983 (CL) Peter Raymond Inch – Thake and Pagington, estate agents
1984 (CL) Peter Raymond Inch

Giddy & Giddy, Thake & Pagington, Estate Agents, c1984-c1990:

1984 Giddy & Giddy, Thake & Pagington.
1985 (CL) Peter Raymond Inch

?? Hampton's, estate agents (see advert)

In 1993 Empty

Nye, Estate Agents, c1980-present:

- NyeHaines, estate agents.
2000 (CL) Anthony Nye
2004 NyeHaines (see advert)
2005 (CL) Anthony Nye
2008 Nye & Co., estate agents
2011 (CL) Anthony Nye
2016 (CL) Anthony Nye

From Norman Hidden papers:

This site and the building on it was part of the estate of the manor of Hungerford Englefield.

In 1470 it was one of the tenements held by King Richard III, late of Walter Hungerford, and formerly of John Golding at a quit rent of 4d p.a. A John Golding was prominent in the town, and is mentioned in several deeds between 1335 and 1369.

In 1552 the property would seem to be held by Robert Throgmorton (lord of the manor by right of his ..?.. nee Hungerford) by John Burke, late in the tenure of Richard Forrest. Neither of these names occur in the 1522 muster, nor in the 1513 terrier.

By 1573 a copyhold in the manor of Hungerfod Englefield was held by Richard Passion and the tenement is stated to have a garden and backside, together with 7 acres of land, of which 2 acres were in the Everlong, 2 in the Breach, and 3 in Pidden Field. He is probably the Richard Passion, weaver who died in 1602, and was buried in the parish church, and who had daughters baptised there (Margaret 1568/9 and Mary 1571). In any event he seems to have moved to another dwelling and was replaced in his copyhold in 1583 by Ingram Rabbettes (or Roberts) for his life and that of his two daughters Mary (born 1575) and Alice (born 1581). His rent, by the way, was 15s 4d, and to this was added the traditional quit rent of 4d. He continued to hold the property until his death aged 64 years when it passed to his daughter Mary. Mary had married William Baynton in 1605, and Alice had married Henry Millson of Aldbourne, so presumably she no longer lived in Hungerford and the residue of Ingram's estate was bequeathed to Mary, who was also his executrix.

The inventory of Ingram's goods mentions a middle chamber, a little chamber, and "his lodging chambers". These were all first floor rooms and in addition there were some "malt lofts" or garrets in which malt was stored. On the ground floor was a hall, a kitchen, and a well house. In addition to the well for the family's domestic water supply, this contained a "yewting(?) vat", barrels and a kiver (or tub). At the front (or High Street) side of the house was a shop, that is a separate door, and a window onto the street which could be covered and barred by wooden shutters. Within the shop were his working tools for his trade as turner or skilled woodworker and "certain ware made, with other necessaries". Outside in the barn which stood in his garden there was a store of corn for the winter.

Mary and William Baynton continued living in the house until William's death in 1636. They had had but one child, Francis, who died shortly after birth. Mary, now 61 years of age, was alone and she quickly re-married, to Alexander Pollentyne (or Polhampton). Her new husband immediately set about repairing the house and the manor Court allocated to him 1 elm tree for this purpose.

The parish register does not record when either Mary or Alexander died, but they were still in possession in 1650 when Ralph Stockewell from Shalbourne took the reversion of the tenement and its land for himself and his brother (?) John upon the death of Mary Polhampton. In view of Mary's age this may have seemed a good investment, but he was not to enter upon the property until some 8 years later when Mary is reported to the Court in October 1658 as dead. Ralph Stockwell was thereupon admitted to the Court. A few years later (1653) Ralph was in trouble, having let part of his dwelling house without the licence of the Court "for which he forfeits his tenement, but upon humble acknowledgement his offence is forgiven". In 1666 the Court Book declares "Ralph Stockwell who holds for his life and John Stockwell who after the death of Ralph should hold for his life, by copy dated 24 March 1650, a tenement with garden and curtilage adjoining, together with 7 acres, formerly in the tenure of Alexander Polhampton in the right of Mary, then his wife, these two give up the premises, and Thomas Robinson junior, brasier, takes the premises, to hold for himself and Susanne Robinson his daughter for term of their lives. Rent was 15s 4d per annum still, but of course a lump sum (valued at £4 back in 1623) was paid by way of a premium to secure the lease. As Ralph had married in 1665 (to Ellin Greene) it is possible that his marriage required or provided a new residence for him, thus enabling the sale of his lease to occur.

The last Court Roll still extant for approximately 100 years, that of April 1675, shows Thomas Robinson still in possession.

Thomas Robinson was a brazier, and he was admitted to the Hocktide Court in 1655 and in is in the list of freesuitors in 1656. In 1665 his wife Susan died and early in 1666 he remarried, so that he too had a special reason for acquiring the lease. His daughter Susan would be an infant, and his copyhold therefore based on her life as well as his own might be expected to be a lengthy one. Thomas Robinson lived until 1717, and in his will he refers to "the copyhold estate wherein I now live". To his wife Joan and his son Thomas he leaves all his household goods "and all the cowcattle, hogs and pigs, and also such firewood as shall have in the backside at the time of my death". This seems to suggest that the animals were kept in the long back garden at least at night. By day they would be driven out along the Cow Lane (now Park Street) to the Down. Also in the "backside", the will tells us, was a "barn". In addition to his own family, Thomas had 2 servants, probably living en famille with him, a manservant named William Pound, and a maidservant Elizabeth Nalder.

The copyhold continued in the family, but the next reference we have to it is not until 1776 in the will of Oliver Pool, innholder of the Red Lion in Charnham Street. He leaves to his wife Mary all his freehold property, stock in trade etc and then goes on to say "and whereas it is in question whether I have not a legal right (as I have) to all that copyhold tenement with garden and cartilage adjoining and 7 acres of arable land in the common fields of Hungerford, formerly in the tenure of John Robinson and parcel of the manor of Hungerford Ingleford, now I do hereby give it to my wife". The name Pool does not appear in the Commoners List for 1781, the position it might be expected to occupy being in some doubt.

See also:

- Hamptons advert, undated

- NyeHaines advert, Jan 2004