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The most important photographer in Hungerford was Albert Parsons. There is a separate section devoted to Albert Parsons and his work.

In addition to Albert Parsons, there were several other photographers and publishers, including:

- Ernest Barnard

- Freeman Brothers

- Samuel Hawkes

- Frederick Jessett

- Alfred Lane

- William Mapson

- William Softley Parry

- Others outside Hungerford who took Hungerford views

Ernest Barnard:

Ernest Barnard published local photographs from his premises at what is now 21 High Street between c1906 and 1918. He bought the single tenement (now 20, 21 and 22 High Street) between the Town Hall and Church Street in c1896 when Killick & Church moved down the street to 17 High Street. He opened a house furniture shop, and later, c1900, converted the premises by re-fronting into three shops. Miss Annie Barnard ran the stationers shop in 1903 (Kelly Directory), but 1911-1939 the stationers was in the name of Ernest Barnard. Bessie and Minnie Barnard ran the tobacconists, toy shop and stationers from 1939 until they passed it on to their nephew Douglas Barnard and his wife. It is said that all three Barnards lived in Rossmore, Park Street with another sister! The property was eventually demolished in 1972 before re-development some years later. The site of the stationers is now Rayners Opticians.

Freeman Brothers:

Freeman Brothers, at 5 Bridge Street, took over the property c1891, when Kelly Directory lists them as tobacconists, fishing tackle, fancy dealers, collector of assessed & income taxes. The 1896 Commoners List has Thomas Gray Freeman as owner. The late Mr E.L. "Jim" Davis said that Freeman's was initially run by Mr. & Mrs. Freeman. They specialised producing books of local views - his lithographic series in 1903 & his photographic series in 1910. Later business run by their two daughters, Miss Emily & Miss Edith. Both fished, tied own flies & were experts on wild flowers. Before their retirement (c1939), they sublet 5 Bridge Street as the Red Stores.(original source: Mills sisters: Elsie and Minnie, 9 Croft Villa). Ray and Jan Baigent ran the Children's Shop and later Options (florists), until it closed in March 2008. The shop is currently (2009) unused.

Note - the advertisement shown in the Photo Gallery (showing 8 & 9 Bridge Street) does not match modern house numbering.

Samuel Hawkes:

Samuel Hawkes, was a photographer, hairdresser and tobacconist in 3 & 4 High Street (now the Tutti Pole Tea Shop) between c1881 and c1920. He was also agent for Sutton & Co., carriers.

Frederick Jessett:

Frederick Jessett of Eddington published photographs for a short period between c1907-1908.

Alfred Lane is recorded in the census of 1871 as "hairdresser and photographer". He was aged 34 years, and living at 4 Bridge Street. Nothing further is yet known of this very early Hungerford photographer.

See Alfred Lane Photo Gallery.

The business was taken over by William Softley Parry in 1877.

William Mapson:

William Mapson From 1891 Kelly Directory has William Mapson as watchmaker. It is likely that this was at 30 High Street (having taken over the business from James Woodham), as he was certainly owner and occupant in the Commoner's List of 1896. He also published photographs (both here and at Pewsey) between c1898-1917. In many, the photograph mounts are stamped "Mapson & Son, Hungerford and Pewsey".

William Mapson continued the business until 1916-17 when 30 High Street was taken over by Albert Parsons the photographer, apparently in a swap of properties arranged with William Mapson and Ernest Clements.

William Softley Parry:

William Softley Parry was a toy dealer and photographer in 4 Bridge Street from 1877, when he took over the business of Alfred Lane. There is a series of eight splendid Cartes de Visite c.1877 taken by William Parry showing various views of the town. By 1903 the premises were occupied by Mr A. New, a cycle maker.

Photo Gallery:

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- Barnard's shops after the re-fronting c1900

- Bridge Street c1910 showing Freeman Bros on the left

- Samuel Hawkes tobacconist shop on right c1895

- 4 Bridge Street (2007) the site of William Softley Parry's business 1877-c1903

- One of a series of eight Cartes de Visites c1877 by William Softley Parry

- A Cartes de Visites c1877 by Thomas B Howe, 42 Northbrook Street, Newbury and Hungeford.

- Group photo, undated [Mapson & Son, Hungerford and Pewsey].

- "1st Hungerford B.B.F.C. 1906-07" [Mapson & Son, Hungerford and Pewsey]

- Constable, Bellman and Tutti-men, Hocktide 1908, Dr Thomas Major, Constable. [Mapson & Son, Hungerford and Pewsey]

Cartes de Visites:

Cartes de Visites were a type of small photograph which was patented in Paris, France by photographer André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri in 1854. It was usually made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card. The size of a carte de visite is 2½ by 3½ inches mounted on a card sized 2½ by 4 inches. It was made popular in 1859 in Europe, and spread rapidly around the world.

Each photograph was the size of a visiting card, and such photograph cards became enormously popular and were traded among friends and visitors. The immense popularity of these card photographs led to the publication and collection of photographs of prominent persons. "Cardomania" spread throughout Europe and then quickly to America. Albums for the collection and display of cards became a common fixture in Victorian parlors.

By the early 1870s, cartes de visite were supplanted by "cabinet cards," which were also usually albumen prints, but larger, mounted on cardboard backs measuring 4½ by 6½ inches. Cabinet cards remained popular into the early twentieth century, when Kodak introduced the Brownie camera and home snapshot photography became a mass phenomenon.

Cartes de Visites Photo Gallery:

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The photo gallery shows examples of Cartes de Visites made by three local photographers.

- Samuel Hawkes

- Alfred Lane

- William Softley Parry

Other local photographers:

A large number of views of Hungerford taken between c1870 and 1950 are known. In addition to the local Hungerford photographers mentioned above, the following should be listed:

Alfred Barratt, Fleet Street, London, 1911.

Blandford, Newbury, 1930-40s.

Chester Vaughan, 1903.

Phillip Collier, Reading, 1907-40.

Elliott and Fry, London, 1910.

Charles Hawker, Newbury, 1883-1937.

A. W. Hoare, Reading, 1930-52.

Thomas B Howe, 542 Northbrook Street, Newbury, and Hungerford.

Frederick Jessett, Eddington, 1907-8.

J. Benjamin Stone, 1902 - see Benjamin Stone's Photo Gallery.

E. Sweetland, High Wycombe, c1905-08

J. Templeman, Stoke-on-Trent, 1914-1918.

W. Wicks, Hayes, Middlesex, 1910.

Wyndham Series, c.1904-32.

See also:

- Benjamin Stone Photo Gallery

- Dating old photographs of Hungerford